Numerous reasons are known as to why marine mammals strand, however, unfortunately it would seem the case that human activity is be a key contributor to these deaths. Data has been collected by the Archipelagos Institute of Marine Conservation ranging from 1994 to the present day, incorporating factors such as seasonality, cause of death, condition
Eco-Navigation is a key action developed by Archipelagos Institute, aiming to increase awareness but also public engagement on the biodiversity and conservation of the Mediterranean Sea. Eco-Navigation aims to record valuable data, through reported sightings by sailors and sea enthusiasts on their observations of rare and protected animals such as marine mammals and turtles,  or
With the worldwide increase in the production of plastics over the last century, in combination with the overall lack of plastic waste management, the impact of plastics on marine environments has become a critical concern. Microplastics develop from the degradation of larger plastics, such as plastic bottles, bags, and many other improperly discarded objects, that
Ship traffic has been increasing in the oceans in recent decades, especially in the northern hemisphere, and very likely will increase exponentially in the future. Anthropic activities  produce diffuse and almost continuous noise that may affect very wide areas. Low-frequency (below 1,000Hz) ambient noise levels generated by ship traffic have increased in the northern hemisphere
Archipelagos’ Eco-navigation project focuses on creating a citizen-science platform about observations of marine mammals (dolphins, whales, seals), sea turtles, invasive species and jellyfish blooms, as well as pollution incidents (plastic debris, oil slicks, etc.) or other unusual sightings. In this way we are in the process of forming a network of sailors, divers, fishermen and
The Archipelagos Marine Mammal Research Team has collected for over 15 years, data from stranded marine animals including sea turtles (Caretta caretta), dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba, Delphinus delphis, Tursiops truncatus), and monk seals (Monachus monachus) from various areas of Greece. The aim of this work is to determine potential hotspots in the Greek Sea and then
The Marine Mammal Team of Archipelagos Institute has for many years been collecting photographs of the populations of the resident Short Beaked Common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) while conducting boat surveys. This valuable photographic material is then processed to perform photo identification via mark and recapture techniques. The researchers and students of Archipelagos’ Marine Mammal Team
The aim of the project is to complete habitat modelling of common dolphins, Delphinus delphis, in the Aegean Sea by using different dynamic models.  Populations of marine mammals found in Mediterranean Sea are genetically distinct from their North Atlantic relatives, which is why the studies revealing their habitats and biology are so important. The Aegean