Soon after arriving in Samos, Greece in June 2019, Vivienne and Amy transferred to the island of Lipsi. Here, they spent the majority of their internship working with Archipelagos on the marine conservation team; Amy, being a recent graduate who studied wildlife conservation and ecology at the University of Chester, UK and Vivienne, who is
Shortly after Saulé, an intern from Lithuania, finished her undergraduate studies in ecology and environmental management at Klaipeda University, she came here to Archipelagos seeking to gain more knowledge of coastal biodiversity, artificial reef research and implementation, and imagery analysis. Due to self-motivation, and because of wonderful colleagues and supervisors from different research fields, her
Before starting her studies in Biology at Radboud University in the Netherlands, our diving enthusiast Jente, is spending her gap year at Archipelagos. Through her internship, she has experienced how the synergy of scientific knowledge and media tools is an essential combination,l in order to effectively communicate the important message of marine conservation. Having always
Studying Environmental Sciences and Sustainability at the University of Glasgow, Rowan was enticed by an internship with Archipelagos for a multitude of reasons; the research areas relevant to her university studies back in the UK, the lab facilities available to her during her internship and Archipelagos’ own research vessels. During her internship, Rowan participated on
Microplastics found under microscope analysis in the facilities of Archipelago Institute. Microplastics are anthropogenic pollutants that enter the water column in two different ways: either as primary sources, known as nurdles or pellets, or as secondary sources from larger plastics fragmented by sun, wind and water forces. These particles measure up to 5mm and are
Here at Archipelagos we have a stranding response program put in place in order to deal with both live and dead strandings. When a live stranding is reported, the team administer first aid to the animal if required. The turtle is then either returned straight back to the water or brought back to the base
Posidonia oceanica is a seagrass species that grows in dense meadows or along channels in the sandy parts of the Mediterranean Sea and is usually found at depths between 1–35 m, depending on the water clarity. This species is exclusively found in the Mediterranean Sea, occupying an area of about 3% of the basin. This
Seagrass meadows are considered to be a crucial coastal ecosystem at global scale which contribute, alongside mangroves and tidal marshes, to ‘Blue Carbon’ storage. These coastal ecosystems through the process of photosynthesis sequester (capture) and store large quantities of carbon within the plants themselves and the underlying sediment layer. In fact, seagrass in some cases can
The endemic Mediterranean Pinna nobilis (Fig. 1) is one of the largest bivalves of the world reaching heights up to 120cm, and found in depths up to 60m. It is partially buried in soft sediment and tends to shelter itself on the edge of seagrass meadows. As an “Endangered Species” it is under protection, according
The Mediterranean Monk seal (Monachus monachus; Figure 1), is currently considered to be facing a ‘very high risk of extinction’. According to the IUCN, it is the most endangered Pinniped species in the world, with less than 600-700 individuals left, of which 300-400 in Greece. Mykali Bay is a rocky beach in the south-eastern side