Bioacoustics is the study of sound produced by living organisms and how sound affects them. It’s an important area of research especially in the marine world as sound is amplified underwater and acoustic interactions are thought to be just as important as visual interaction. Cetaceans produce 3 distinct types of noise: Whistles – This type
Background Public awareness is rising for the danger plastics are causing to the marine environment, but it can still improve further. Tourists are a major part of a beaches population during the summer months of a year, their presence can have both positive and negative effects. They bring many items to the beach and can
Recognising an individual within a study population is a key issue in many behavioural and ecological studies of animals. A good method for this is photo-identification (photo-ID), a technique that is based on the repeated identification of individuals through pictures. It is an important, non-invasive tool since marine mammals do not have to be physically
As winter arrives, it brings along various species of birds that are travelling from different parts of the world, migrating from their origin to seek better food resources, nesting areas, and climate conditions that correspond to changes in their environment. Due to the collective anthropogenic impacts worldwide, which have accumulated overtime since the industrialisation period
An important part of science is the way it is presented. The media team plays a large role in this at Archipelagos. Infographics, scientific posters, business cards; our interns are always designing things to communicate what we do at the institute. A primary part of our work  is data visualisation. Data visualisation is the presentation
Here at Archipelagos we have a stranding response program put in place in order to deal with both live and dead strandings. When a live stranding is reported, the team administer first aid to the animal if required. The turtle is then either returned straight back to the water or brought back to the base
Posidonia oceanica is a seagrass species that grows in dense meadows or along channels in the sandy parts of the Mediterranean Sea and is usually found at depths between 1–35 m, depending on the water clarity. This species is exclusively found in the Mediterranean Sea, occupying an area of about 3% of the basin. This
Seagrass meadows are considered to be a crucial coastal ecosystem at global scale which contribute, alongside mangroves and tidal marshes, to ‘Blue Carbon’ storage. These coastal ecosystems through the process of photosynthesis sequester (capture) and store large quantities of carbon within the plants themselves and the underlying sediment layer. In fact, seagrass in some cases can
The endemic Mediterranean Pinna nobilis (Fig. 1) is one of the largest bivalves of the world reaching heights up to 120cm, and found in depths up to 60m. It is partially buried in soft sediment and tends to shelter itself on the edge of seagrass meadows. As an “Endangered Species” it is under protection, according
As the winter approaches reptiles are preparing for brumation, a process similar to hibernation but for cold-blooded animals, to handle an extreme change in temperature, burying themselves under the soil. Reptiles are crucial to study due to their high susceptibility to environmental changes and our projects focus on the habitat preference of the Common chameleon