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Nonparental Infanticide in Colonial Eleonora’s Falcons

Title:
Nonparental Infanticide in Colonial Eleonora’s Falcons (2016).
Authors:
R. Steen, A. Miliou, T. Tsimpidis, V. Selås and G. A. Sonerud

Abstract:
Infanticide denotes the act of an adult killing a conspecific infant, either its own offspring, the offspring of its future mate, or the offspring of any other conspecific individual (Hrdy 1979). During unfavorable conditions non-parents can exploit infants as food or kill them to reduce future competition (Hrdy 1979). Infanticide is most notably known from carnivores such as lions (Panthera leo) and brown bears (Ursus arctos), where it is sexually selected (Bertram 1975, Swenson et al. 1997), but it is common also in birds (Moreno 2012). For raptors, recorded cases of infanticide include parents killing their own offspring to feed siblings (Bortolotti et al. 1991, Kornˇan and Macek 2011, Ortega-Jimenez et al. 2011), and a case of a nesting female Lesser Kestrel (Falco naumanni) taking nestlings from conspecifics in a breeding colony (Negro et al. 1992).